Tag Archives: voice acting

Check Out the New VoiceOver Insider

So after a few months hiatus, veteran voice actress Julie Williams has re-launched her venerable newsletter “VoiceOver Insider” in the form of an on-line news magazine.

In it’s former life, you would sign up for her mailing list, and it would be emailed to you in the PDF format once a month. Lots of work, and things could become dated pretty fast.

This new format allows Julie and her editor Gary McFadden to keep the content fresh and since it is built on the WordPress platform, you can comment on some of the articles.

There’s a little something for everyone, whether you are a newbie, or like some of us who started in the reel-to reel days.You know who you are.

There is the “Newbies Corner” with articles written by seasoned pros and a “technical” category for us gadget geeks. There’s a good discussion of how to get studio condenser mic audio into your iPad for auditioning on the go.

Other categories include the all important VO Training and VO Business, but nothing about Feeding Monkeys.

So hats off to Julie and Gary and their guest authors. Well done. I think you too should check it out. Or go read it.

Marc Cashman Voice-Over Workshop Coming to Dallas

Photo of Marc Cashman

Marc is an L.A. based voice talent, director, writer and commercial producer. He is coming to Dallas to conduct a workshop the weekend of February 12-13 at CakeMix Recording.

Marc works on both sides of the glass both as a talent and as a producer and has done so for many years. I’m looking forward to what he has to teach us from that point of view.

Oh, and we are going to get a report card at the end of the class.  I wonder whom I’ll  have to show it to and get it signed.  My agents? Does this mean I’ll actually have to pay attention? Crap.

Kidding aside, here’s an email he sent yesterday with details of the class:

There are still a few seats left
in my two intensive 1-day V-O workshops for
Beginners/Intermediates and Advanced/Working pros!
Limit: just ten people for each workshop.
Here’s the info:

“The ‘Cashman Cache’ Commercial V-O Workshop”
Saturday, February 12th, 2011, 10A-6P
at Cakemix Recording

Just four seats left!

Just getting started?
My direction and instruction will kick-start your V-O experience,
laying the strong foundation that every voice actor needs.
If you’re an Intermediate student and have a few V-O courses under your belt,
I’ll help you on your way to achieving solid competence in voice acting,
giving you the tools to diminish or eliminate your weaknesses and maximize your strengths!
With my proven, practical techniques, you’ll learn to:

*Find your signature voice
*Sound conversational
*Size up a script in 60 seconds or less

All with exercises designed to prepare you for the real world of voice-over.
And of course, time will be set aside at the end for Q&A.
You’ll also get the famous “Cashman Cache” V-O Report Card, an X-ray of your abilities,
where you’ll be graded on a 1-10 scale in eight critical V-O categories.

Advanced/Working Pro Master Class:
“Are You As Good As Your Demo?”
Sunday, Feb. 13th, 2011, 10A-6P
at Cakemix Recording

Just three seats left!

Got a bunch of classes under your belt?
Got a V-O demo or ready to make one?
Auditioning and/or working part-time or full-time?
I’ll help you hone your talent and give you the tools and confidence you need
to catapult your performances to the next level and book more V-O jobs!
And if you have a demo, the question will be answered in this humbling workshop:
Are you as good as your demo?
This workshop will be highly individualized, cover multiple genres,
will concentrate on the acting part of voice acting, and will reveal:

* The tricks for great self-direction
*How to submit stand out, winning auditions
*How to discern your target audience instantly
and much, much more.

Plus, the famous “Cashman Cache” V-O Report Card is included.
What do you think your GPA will be?
And there’ll be no wasted time rehearsing in this workshop.
I’ll be sending you your scripts (and tons of materials) ahead of time, before class starts,
so you’ll be ready to hit the ground running.
If you want to experience a fun, challenging, rigorous V-O workshop,
this is the one to mark your calendar in 2011.

But don’t take my word for it.
Read the testimonials in the attachment!
Dozens of my students are currently working full-time in voiceover,

Breakfast, Lunch and Snacks included!
Just $350.
No VISA, AMEX or Paypal or cash–sorry.
Checks, money orders or postal orders fine.
Call or email me to reserve your seat before it’s gone!
And contact me with any questions anytime.
I look forward to seeing you in Dallas!

P.S. If you know of anyone in or near Dallas who’d be interested,
please forward this email!

Marc Cashman

Physical Movement in Voice Acting-Just do What Works

During my time in the voiceover business I’ve been witness to many different styles of acting before the microphone. I’ve seen actors silently but not so subtley move their entire bodies while doing the read. And I’ve seen the flat dry monotone read done while the actor stands stiff as a statue with hands crammed in pockets.

Looking at session videos on YouTube or Voiceover Universe you also see a variety of hand placements and gestures. Some actors bring energy into the read by waving hands or wagging fingers. Others will clinch a fist against their noggin to help get tension into the material. Ed Grover was famous for clasping his hands on top of his head to help him open up that “sweeping” read he would do for Visa.

If I’m doing a training narration I tend to gesture a lot, talking with my hands in order to help emphasize and draw certain phrases or word groups out of copy that is by it’s nature pretty dry stuff.

While voicing retail copy I try to get a little more energy into the read by rapidly wagging a wrist around behind the mic. I do most of the fast legal reads for Nationwide Insurance radio and for those I stand like a statue with arms up and out and pour  the energy into cramming all those words into the shortest space possible.

On the other hand there are voice actors who prefer not to use overly physical techniques and still bring wonderful life to their scripts through emotional connection to the words.

If you are just starting out, practice and experiment. Get training. Use a coach. Find the techniques that work best for you.

Voiceovers for the local TV station

There are many genres of work for the voice actor. One of them is voicing promos for TV at the local station level. The “Here’s what’s coming up tonight on CBS 11″ kind of thing.

What sort of voice actor does well at this? Producer Robert Dwyer has a few thoughts:

“You want to be voice-over talent? Well, here’s some advice from a guy who hires VO people and what makes them valuable to a 19th market TV station.“

Read the rest here.